Tag Archives: London International Mime Festival

Blind Summit: The Heads

Blind Summit: The Heads

January 21st, 2013 by

In devised work, it’s the frame that often carries the weight of really communicating a show. In work that’s experimental in form and that draws the audience into its fictions in unconventional ways, it’s the frame that creates and clarifies meaning. Blind Summit’s new production, The Heads – developed from one section of their previous […]

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Simone Riccio: Nothing Moves If I Don’t Push It ¦ Photo: Ben Hoppper

Simone Riccio: Nothing Moves If I Don’t Push It

January 18th, 2013 by

Simone Riccio takes to the stage, dressed head to toe in smart-casual attire, with a peaked cap placed on his head at an enticingly jaunty angle. Then without rhyme or reason, he takes it all off to reveal another suit below. It’s a sign of things to come. He looks out at us for a […]

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Compagnie 111: Plan B ¦ Photo: Agale Bory

Compagnie 111: Plan B

January 18th, 2013 by

Returning in the tenth anniversary year of its creation, Compagnie 111’s second work Plan B hasn’t quite the striking impression of the company’s later works (most notably the arresting and singular Sans Objet seen at the 2011 Mime Festival). What Plan B does, though, is provide an artful introduction to the principles of Compagnie 111’s […]

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Yeung Fai: Hand Stories ¦ Photo: Mario del Curto

Yeung Fai: Hand Stories

January 17th, 2013 by

Asian countries with a strong puppet tradition, such as Indonesia, Japan and China, have for some years worked on a modern approach to their theatre, but have found the international demand for their traditional shows a heavy drag on new creations. Yeung Fai has found a highly intelligent way to shake off the cobwebby aspects […]

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Stan's Cafe: The Cardinals

Stan’s Cafe: The Cardinals

January 17th, 2013 by

British stalwarts Stan’s Cafe’s latest work mines a range of familiar comic theatrical tropes: the backstage action revealed, the deconstruction of well-known tales, and amateurs staging a performance. In The Cardinals the company set three red-robed cardinals the task of staging the (hi)story of the Holy Land, from Genesis to modern day Jerusalem. Inside a […]

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